Actions will depend on each individual farm business; there isn’t going to be one single approach that will suit all farms. Adaptation Scotland suggest the following ideas for consideration:

  • Changing the timing of crop establishment and harvesting
  • Selecting different crop varieties and modifying pesticide programmes
  • Investing in irrigation equipment and water storage facilities
  • Improving soil drainage and increased use of soil conditioning equipment
  • Changing enterprise mix
  • Changing timing of lambing/calving/housing and turnout of livestock
  • Increased provision of shelter for grazing livestock
  • Investing in more robust, better ventilated buildings
  • Becoming less reliant on grass silage for winter fodder
  • Increasing use of risk management techniques
  • Investigate drought resistant varieties of crops or alternative livestock breeds
  • Consider planting shelter or shade belts to protect livestock
  • Join or initiate an abstractor group to facilitate liaison with regulators, or look into other collaborative approaches to share resources
  • Ensure buildings are maintained and prepared for more stormy weather
  • Consider adjusting growing practices to take account of more winter soil erosion events
  • Extreme events may lead to more yield variability increasing the need to plan, extend the range of crops and potentially increase ‘speculative’ planting (in the hope there could be a ‘good’ year for a particular crop)
  • Collect excess rainwater for use in drought periods
  • Consider the advantages of longer growing seasons for double-cropping or using a greater number of varieties
  • Consider investigating greater crop rotation and using field margins to encourage pest predators